How being sheltered improves your socialization

Michael Jackson at the Cannes film festival.

Image via Wikipedia

Wow, I am really sorry guys. Yesterday was a pretty tough day for me, and I completely forgot about my poor blog. So I hope you’ll forgive me and read this, even though it’s a day late. 🙂

I remember about three and half years or so ago, I was riding in a car with Bro. James and Bro. Phil, two of the staff at Shenandoah Boy’s Ranch. We were out doing errands, while the rest of the guys at the ranch were off doing… other stuff, I don’t remember what. It was a privilege to get the exclusive privilege to ride with them. We always looked forward to such things to help break up the predictability of our lives. (And I liked it also because of the funny odd feeling I got riding in a car – I’m so ridiculously used to big rigs that riding in a car feels like flying a space ship.)

We were discussing things along the way all friendly-like, and the conversation turned from my odd taste in movies (a very popular subject of discussion at the ranch, heh) to my lack of knowledge of things sporting. Sporty? Sportish. Whatever.

I was challenged to name a single sports star. I named Babe Ruth.

Why? Because in Peanuts, Snoopy was planning to tie his home run record. (We have an old hardbound copy of Peanuts from my dad’s childhood personal library.)

That was all I could name.

They were flabbergasted, and a tad bit overcome with discombobulation. “You don’t even know who Michael Jordan is??” they said.

“Um… you mean the black guy who looks funny because of all the plastic surgery?”

* dead silence and shocked awe at my endless knowledge of sports stars *

Evidently there are two famous people with the first name of Michael and whose last names start in J. Go figure. Sounds like a grand plan… let’s all confuse Jay!

Now anyone who knows me reasonably well (at least my more modern regenerated form, even though my hair isn’t quite ginger yet) knows that I am quite a bit more aware of my secular surroundings than I was. Quite a bit, yes quite a bit.

But here’s the thing. In ten seconds flat I had not only discovered who Michael Jordan is, but what he is famous for (and the connection to the tennis shoes too). And I remembered too. Well, most of it anyway.

And not only that, but now I also know a good deal more about Michael Jackson too (having watched a few of his songs and such like and fiddled with the moonwalk a tidbit).

That didn’t take more than a couple days. And I was completely caught up with all the other raving fans. (Well maybe not with the maniacs who know every bit of ML trivia that ever existed and some that didn’t, but who cares about that stuff?)

So what’s the point?

Well the point is… what would have been the point in me learning it all earlier?

They were astonished at my lack of secular knowledge, but why? Up to that point I didn’t need it, and once I did need it, I picked it up faster than you pick up red spots from a measle party. So who cares when I learned it, as long as I know it when I need to know it?

So at least as far as trivia about the world at large is concerned, who cares? Learn it when you need it, and you’ll be fine. No need to gorge yourself on the things ‘society’ says you need to know just in case you ever need to… talk about it… or something.

I am insatiably curious. Absolutely indefatigable when it comes to finding stuff out. Anything, I really don’t care what it is, as long as I don’t know it and I know I can know it. But even I find things uninteresting until something or someone has piqued my fascination in it. Prove to me its value (even if all it takes is mentioning it to me) and I’ll go and jump into it. But not before.

It’s similar with socialization. It’s ridiculous to say that your family and those you learn from and your mentors and even your books aren’t “society” and that by spending time with them isn’t “socializing.” It’s simply rubbish.

What people are saying when they accuse us sheltered people of not being socialized is that we aren’t learning the things they think are important.

Such as the difference between the MJs.

They value such things, and they measure our competence on their plane of value. But we’re using an entirely different axis, a radically different dimension to measure our success and competence.

Sheltering your children merely means you are consciously choosing what measure of competence you are using, and then prioritizing their influences based upon it. Very simple.

So are you missing out?

Yep.

But you want to. It’s not that you don’t like those things (hey, it’s rather interesting, at least to me anyway). It’s just that you’d rather learn other things first. Your priorities are different.

Make sense? Good. 😉

Why Do I Want to be a Mom at Home?

Baby-global

Image via Wikipedia

* chuckles * Ahem. Well, I don’t want to be a mom at home. But several of my friends do, and one of them gladly offered to write a guest post about it for me. Wasn’t that nice of her? Yes, it was.

Anyways, without further ado and preliminary pontification, here is Kaitlyn’s post.

In today’s rampant feministic culture, there are two terms viewed as the most degrading titles that could possibly be attached to womankind.  These are the “Stay at Home Mom” label, and the “Homemaker” designation.  These two words, when spoken, immediately lower your status as a woman.  Why is that?  When did fulfilling the most rewarding and influential job become a social death?

Being a Homemaker is one of the most rewarding jobs womankind can ever have. Society says you aren’t a productive, contributing member of the social order; I say, hogwash!  These women spend their lives pouring into the next generation.  How can there possibly be no power behind she who molds the future?

Society’s expectations require most people to sacrifice their own integrity and identity, turning them into something they are not, simply to fit a norm. If you don’t go out of your way to fit that norm, then you’re shunned. You have now fallen into a no-win situation.  We allow society to run our lives way too often. As humans we have a propensity to follow what culture says, not necessarily what we actually believe.

Let me ask you this; have you really looked at what society wants?  Do you want to be there for your daughter’s first laugh, her first steps, or would you rather have someone else tell you about them because you had to be in a corporate meeting?  In essence, when all is boiled down, you are being asked to give up your life with your child for a dog eat dog world.  For many it is a very hard decision, one with lasting effects either way, but one that is worth the contemplation. In my exodus from feminism, I have found that a child can never be replaced.  This is a serious issue we are discussing, one that often just gets swept under the rug.

I was once antagonistically challenged about why I wanted to be a Homemaker.  What glory could ever come from such a role?  In an effort to keep my tongue from running needlessly and becoming defensive towards my contender, I wrote this response:

A Homemaker?  Why?

In today’s culture I believe it is vitally important for a young woman to know why she wants to be a homemaker.  In response to said question I have thought out my answer.  I want to be a homemaker because…

I can stop my children at any time of day and say ‘Let us praise the Lord’.

We can lay by the fire and listen to Daddy reading from the Bible as our imaginations act out the story of David and Goliath.

I can be there whenever they need; I’m available for them at any time of day!

I can knit a feather soft blanket while I rock in my rocker, teaching a little one to read.

My children will get to lick bowls and spoons of chocolate cake batter (home made of course, and no white flour please!) and smile with chocolate covered lips.

We can play Legos on an old rag rug that we made ourselves.

We can finger paint.

I can make little iced cookies in the shape of hearts.  Then me and the little people who call me Mommy can sit down and eat them with the goat’s milk we milked ourselves.

We can play with peanut butter play dough and then eat everything we have constructed.

I can spend the time to make the house warm and inviting for the man of my castle who has spent a long hard day on the battle field.

I’ll get to be my husband’s wife, and not the boss’ secretary.

I can spend life with that special man and be his help mate.

I can learn to read my husband’s thoughts.

I can sprawl across my fourteen-year-old’s bed and just listen.

My boys can bring in frogs to show me, or display their 12’’ snake they just caught (no poisonous ones please, mommy doesn’t like that kind).

I can grab the camera and capture that Kodak moment of the boys in a full blown mud fight (no cow pies please boys).  I proceed to smile and shake my head; hand on my hip of course, at those mud spattered boys who want to come in my house.

Then I get to send them out to the hose and spray them off myself!

I can fill mason jars full of pretty honey jellies and preserves, then watch my six year old slather his whole wheat toast with it, licking his lips in anticipation.

We can catch tadpoles in the pond and watch them grow.

When we go shopping at the store I can proudly say, ‘Yes, they are all mine, and yes, we are having more!’

When the kids get sick I don’t have to call the baby sitter or cancel from work.  I can just nurture and comfort them without any hassle or groan.

We can snuggle on the couch under our thick colorful quilt and drink homemade chicken noodle soup from our favorite mug while watching Facing the Giants.

Snuggling is good for the soul!

We can go outside in the fresh snow and build a snow family.  Then we can come in and warm our hands around a nice big mug of hot honey cocoa.

I can crawl around on hands and knees in the garden looking for wooly worms with my ecstatic diapered helpers.

My two year old can kiss me whenever he wants, and I can kiss him whenever I want.

We can put vinegar and baking soda together into a jar and cap it with a balloon for our science experiment.

My little girls can come to me and ask how long to cook their stew.

My boys can bring me their newest addition of holey jeans to patch.

We can read G.A. Henty before nap-time; every child should grow up with those.

I can spend the time to French braid my little girl’s hair.

I can give my baby a bath and spend that extra moment just breathing in their fresh skin.

I can simply make the house feel like home.

I can dictate what I want to do and when.  How many high, well paid officials can do that?

I can be a role model for my girls.

I can raise my baby instead of the baby sitter or daycare doing it.

I will know where my little ones are and what they are doing because they’re with me.  I don’t have to ask “How was your day today?”  I already know!

I want to be a homemaker, because no one will know that man’s heart like me, and no one will have the hearts of our children but us (well, and Grandpa of course).

Don’t think I won’t be busy; my work is never done.  I will have “the time”, but not for worldly pursuits.  I will have the time for nurturing and growing, for teaching and training, for watching and raising my children to grow to maturity.  I will have “the time”` because I have made my family and my home my life.

I wear many corporate hats.  Teacher, Doctor, Psychologist, Therapist, Coach, Referee, etc.
I don’t put in a time card, my work is twenty four seven.  I don’t drive away for work; I need not leave my home to find my purpose.

My job is the most fulfilling womankind has ever known.  After all, my occupation is encapsulated in the beautiful words of Wife and Mommy.

Why will I be a homemaker?  Because I get to be at home, and that is just where God intended me to be.

Envy me my friend, or think ill of me for my choices, but never never pity me; for who could pity love?

I never received an answer to my letter.  Perhaps it was just as well, but let me ask you all a fundamental question.  When did it become wrong for a woman to spend her life loving and caring for her family?  When did it become wrong to be servants of the Lord pouring our lives into eternal souls who will not fade away with time?  The corporate world will one day end.  Will woman kind be found having poured their lives into objects that fade into dust?  Or will her legacy live on in the lives of her children and their children’s children?

Society looks on this role as demeaning, degrading to women.   I have found quite the opposite.  I view society’s demands that woman leave this sacred sphere of influence to be the height of degradation.  Give up my most sacred and glorified calling? For what, may I ask?  I’ve never found anything more rewarding then having my three year old sister run to me, her little arms entwined around my neck, her face nuzzled against me; and she’s not even my child.  I have never found anything that made me feel more loved or needed than my 16 month old brother grasping my finger, his heart rate easing as I softly sang to him in his times of distress.

I believe that women are very capable in the work place.  They are strong, intellectual, articulate, and devoted.  We as women want to change the world, make it a better place.  But I pose this closing thought to you.  Why isn’t strong, intellectual, articulate and devoted women changing their families vitally important?  They aren’t just changing their sphere of influence; they are crafting and molding the next generation, and, by default, the world and its future.  John Piper once said a mother on her knees had more power than any high dollar big shot in the corporate world.  When the women of our culture realizes that women have been changing the world for centuries in their homes and through their children, then we might see a massive change in our world as we know it.

Children need consistent and constant love and attention, parents united together to guide them through childhood so that they may learn to steer by the time they are adults.  Families now are broken apart, and that fragmentation is damaging for everyone. Mothers need to be a safe place for children again; a source of comfort and nurturing.  Fathers need to be a leader and sheltering protection from the harsh cruelties of the world their families are placed in.

When the world can see that it doesn’t have to be one or the other –changing the world or being a mom with a full time dedication to her family–then we will be making progress toward a more productive society.

-Kaitlyn

Deep in the heart of the Midwest, Kaitlyn tries to live out her life is service to her Lord and Savior as a writer and child of the Most High.  She juggles the many gift and passions the Lord has given her while remaining at home to help her family in their daily lives.  Kaitlyn is passionately committed to her younger homeschooled siblings, and is devoted to exposing the lies of the Feminist movement that so many young women and men buy into.  She blogs at http://prayforsamuelian.blogspot.com/

Abdication

 

Napoleon's abdication

Image via Wikipedia

 

AB’DICATE, v.t. [L. abdica; ab and dico, to dedicate, to bestow, but the literal primary sense of dico is to send or thrust.]
1. In a general sense, to relinquish, renounce, or abandon.
2. To abandon an office or trust, without a formal resignation to those who conferred it, or without their consent; also to abandon a throne, without a formal surrender of the crown.
3. To relinquish an office before the expiration of the time of service.
4. To reject; to renounce; to abandon as a right.
5. To cast away; to renounce; as to abdicate our mental faculties [Unusual.]
6. In the civil law, to disclaim a son and expel him from the family, as a father; to disinherit during the life of the father.
AB’DICATE, v.i. To renounce; to abandon; to cast off; to relinquish, as a right, power, or trust.
Though a King may abdicate for his own person, he cannot abdicate for the monarchy.

For the month of November, I will be neglecting this blog, so that I may focus my creative powers upon the challenge of NaNoWriMo.

My goal is to complete a 140,000 word novel this month, with the purpose of publishing it. As such, I need to write, on average, about 5000 words a day. Fun.

So talk to you later, and wish me luck. 😉

A Review of Stephen Lawhead’s Skin Map

 

The Skin Map

The Skin Map

 

When I got The Skin Map from Booksneeze (at no charge, no obligations, very awesome), I really had no idea what to expect. I had already read a few of Stephen Lawhead‘s books, and I knew that he had a diverse range of style. So I dug in with no preconceived notions about what it would be like.

And I loved it.

His mastery of the art of description is beyond belief (I had to stop several times to jump up and down because I loved his style so much, seriously). His level of attention to details like period mindset and speech is a delight to behold (especially for die-hard background-first novelists like me).

My only quibble was that he doesn’t end the first book as a stand-alone. He makes you need to read the next one to continue the story arc properly. And that isn’t out yet, which is maddening.

And for those of you who are worried about inappropriate content (I was a bit, since his Song of Albion trilogy had some), don’t be. It is completely clean. Utterly. I couldn’t have been more pleased on that score (and promptly gave it to my little siblings to share).

5 out of 5 stars, very recommended.

Oh No! A Disagreement!

What do you want me to do? LEAVE? Then they'll keep being wrong!

What do you want me to do? LEAVE? Then they'll keep being wrong!

Laugh. 🙂

That comic is funny, but it is also very true.

How many times do we get bent out of shape, and spend precious moments of our time (and every moment is precious), trying to convince someone just because they are wrong?

Think about it: there are over six and a half billion people on this planet. That is a lot. But that number pales to insignificance when you consider the amount of knowledge available in the universe. Every detail of every action of all time; every fact of every attribute of every event and every object that ever occurred or existed; every thought of every human in response to every stimulus in history.

That still blows me away.

When you consider the vastness of total knowledge, the amount you think you know becomes a tiny spot, indistinguishable in a lake of ink that spreads as far as the horizon.

And then when you look at what you know, with an honest mind, how much do you really know? How many times have you held something with absolute conviction, yet only to renounce it as complete foolishness a few short years later? Hopefully many, many times. There is very little we can be sure of. I won’t say, like many, that there is nothing that we can be sure of, which is foolishness. But the vast majority of our knowledge is on very shaky ground.

So when you couple these two considerations together, you must realize the self-evident fact that the huge, vast majority of people in the world are just simply wrong about almost everything, including yourself. (By the way, no one is wrong about everything: each person has a certain measure of absolute truth in their keeping.)

This is a humbling, and a daunting prospect. Only God is absolutely right, with absolute knowledge. And it is insufferable arrogance to assume that we are anywhere close to Him in that regard.

So what do we do when we find out that someone * gasp * is wrong?

Well most of the time we can simply pass on. We have other things to do. At least, hopefully we do. There are only a very few, very rare situations in which it is appropriate and helpful to address someone’s perceived error.

And even then, first make sure that you are really in disagreement. The vast, vast majority of perceived disagreements are just that, perceived. It is extremely easy to mistake someone’s point of view. And it is even easier to assume that they believe things that they really don’t: you might be in agreement on everything they say except for one small point.

Then, don’t attack. Being mistaken is never a sin in itself, even in matters of doctrine, and it is rarely very bad either. It can be dangerous, though, which should motivate us to be as kind and unselfish as possible in helping the other person.

And above all…

Don’t lose sleep over it. 😉

Rebellion and You

Torah inside of the former Glockengasse synago...
Image via Wikipedia

What is rebellion?

First, why do we care? That question is easily dealt with:

1 Samuel 15:23 For rebellion [is as] the sin of witchcraft, and stubbornness [is as] iniquity and idolatry. Because thou hast rejected the word of the LORD, he hath also rejected thee from [being] king.

Proverbs 17:11 An evil [man] seeketh only rebellion: therefore a cruel messenger shall be sent against him.

Jeremiah 28:16 Therefore thus saith the LORD; Behold, I will cast thee from off the face of the earth: this year thou shalt die, because thou hast taught rebellion against the LORD.

Remember that both rebellion and witchcraft were punished by stoning in OT Israel. Ouch. So… what is rebellion then?

Of course you know where I am going to go to find out, don’t you? 🙂

Yup, Webster’s 1828 Dictionary.

Open resistance to lawful authority.”

That is the short bit, and all we really need here, but the rest is very cool too, so check it out if you are interested. [http://1828.sorabji.com/1828/words/r/rebellion.html]

The only proper (meaning ‘approved by Jay’) shift of meaning that has transpired since Webster’s writing of this cogent definition is a variation of use which allows for rebellion to occur covertly, rather than openly. One may have a rebellious attitude that remains sequestered within your breast, and never sees the light of day, and yet remains truly rebellious in the sight of God.

(One could argue that this sense still retains the quality of openness, since all things are open to God. But if you take that into consideration you might as well strike it out of the definition anyways since all things are open and thus it ceases to be a defining factor.)

On to the next word.

What does it mean to resist?

To stand against; to withstand.”

To set yourself against something means that you are out from under it. You cannot be submissive and rebellious simultaneously. Thus rebellion is a rejection of authority.

Ah, but not just any authority.

Lawful authority.

I think that little word there, Lawful, is the most important word in that definition. I believe that is so because of this simple fact that it makes true:

You cannot rebel against unlawful authority. It simply cannot be done.

This ties directly into Romans 13:1-2.

Romans 13:1-2 Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God.

2 Whosoever therefore resisteth the power, resisteth the ordinance of God: and they that resist shall receive to themselves damnation.

The message of this passage is very clear and simple: Authority only comes from God. And so to resist lawful authority (rebellion) is indeed resisting God just as much as if you spit in His holy face or committed witchcraft.

Because of this powerful fact, we must be very careful. Why? People claim to have authority over us constantly, and by thereby demanding obedience of us they are claiming to be the ministers of God. Whether or not they think they are claiming this is irrelevant.

The Bible is very very clear that we are all equal, and equally at liberty from the control of others, except where God has specifically delineated an authority figure to perform a specific function.

These authority figures are defined and instituted by God for our good. That is His created order: for us to submit ourselves to these authority figures. I cannot go into all of the different ones here (that is a matter for many books), but I do want to point something out:

If an authority figure steps outside of his jurisdiction and exerts control that was not given him by God, he is sinning. And by definition, he is sinning against someone (or more than one someone). This does not mean that we ought to revolt (notice my word choice: we can’t rebel against him, since he isn’t exerting lawful authority, we can only revolt) against him, though. Generally we ought to merely yield (give up your cloak, turn the other cheek, etc.). There are very few situations in which the Bible commands us to revolt, resist, and overthrow unlawful authority. Most of the time we ought to pass it by.

Realize this though: your parents are your lawful authority, and their jurisdiction is far reaching. Their authority surpasses and supersedes the authority of every other ordination of God. That means that if your pastor tells you to do one thing, and your father tells you to do another, you obey your father. Period. Full stop. No questions, no buts, no hesitations, no qualms.

Realize also that even if your parents tell you to do something that you consider to be sin (like for example not going to church, or not wearing a headcovering, or going to public school, or reading a secular book on the ‘Sabbath’ day (I am looking at you Elsie Dinsmore)) in the vast majority of cases, you ought to obey. Even if they are not saved. (Especially if they are not saved, depending on how you look at it.) This passes the responsibility for that action onto them, and God will bless you in that deed.

Why do I say this? Wouldn’t God say that you aren’t rebelling since it isn’t their jurisdiction?

Because God commanded us to do it. Do a study of 1 Peter 3:1-6 and ask me about it in the comments if you don’t see it.

Controversial issue, I know. But those who know me know that I don’t shy from those. * smile * There are a lot of facets that I haven’t covered (such as when parental authority ceases to be binding), but I will save those for another time and another post.

What do you think? How do you think you should change your life in light of this study? In particular, what do you think about how you are treating (and thinking about) your parents? Are you rebelling against them in your heart or in your actions by simply not yielding to them with all your heart?

My New Mascot

Greetings all!

We just got a really nice package from some really nice friends of ours in the States (the Manns). One of the items in it was to me, from 5-year-old Matthew. It was a nice little bear (he sent me a few other things too, very nice). I am 20. A professional web designer and developer, a project leader and a rebelutionary. So what do I do with a little bear from a 5-year-old?

I make him into a mascot.

I am serious. I am very pleased with my little gift, and I really appreciate Matthew sharing one of his little toys with me. I am four times his age, but he is definitely one of my friends, and I enjoy talking to him over the internet.

Matthew is a perfect example of a principle that I hold very passionately: non-segregation of age.

I am just as comfortable talking to people who are 4 times my age as to people who are a quarter my age (talking to people my own age is a different story, but we shall pass that over for now). And I believe that is the way it should be. We should focus on family-to-family communication and not peer-to-peer communication. This is the way that God designed things to work.

My gift from and friendship with Matthew is also a prime example of something else that I love.

My online network: my overseas friends. I knows hundreds of people online that I would never know existed if it wasn’t for the internet. Most of my best friends are on the other side of the world (practically), and known entirely through the internet. It is a tremendous blessing from God that we are able to do that now. And Matthew is a prime example of that.

And so, in honor of these principles, and of Matthew (and in honor of the other 3-5 friends I have that are named ‘Matthew’), I am naming my new mascot ‘Matt.’